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Science


The center of the periodic chart of elements consists of what are known as the "transition elements," meaning that they can transit from metallic to monatomic or diatomic via chemical treatment or through other means (what some would refer to as "shadow chemistry" or "arcane chemistry" or even "alchemy"). Take gold for example. When you have two or more gold atoms in a microcluster, it will have metallic properties, but if you have only one atom, it will then have ceramic properties, which means that it becomes chemically inert but at the same time will have superconductive capabilities even at room temperature. The weight of these amazing materials can also change by heating, becoming lighter, even to the point of levitation. Because it is chemically inert, it can be ingested for health, wellbeing and super-energizing at the cellular level.

 

Not only do our cells communicate via chemicals and electricity in our nervous system, they also communicate intercellularly through the exchange of photons or light particles and other processes, as well. The human body is a marvelous bioelectric machine, and all of its processes depend on the clear and (ideally) unimpeded conduction of electrical "messages" required to carry out those processes. Light, as proven by fiber optics, can carry more and actually "purer" information. As mentioned above, these materials are superconductive, and therefore change our bodies at the cellular level, from our organs, muscles and tissues to our brain and nervous system, into superconductors of a greatly increased flow of photons, greatly increased because the materials themselves are in a sense "liquid (or powdered) light." It's like installing 'gold tipped' wires on your brain synapse. Put another way, you could say that monatomics transform the body's "wiring" from being simple copper cable to being wired with fiber-optics, where the same "width" of wiring is able to carry 1,000 times as much 'processing' information.

 

 

THE SYNAPSE

The Synapse

 

 

Instituto de Fisiologia Celular

Since neurons form a network of electrical activities, they somehow have to be interconnected. This connection is not a simple continuity of cytoplasm, so that every neuron has electrical continuity with all others, as happens with simple wiring, but is carried out by very specialized and complex structures called synapses. A synapse is the place where two neurons join in such a way that a signal can be transmitted from one to the other. The typical and overwhelmingly most abundant type of synapse is the one in which the axon of one neuron activates a second neuron, usually making a synapse with one of its dendrites or with the cell body. There are two ways in which this can happen, one is by the coupling of ion channels at the synapse, creating a passage way for the traveling ionic flux of the action and membrane potentials, which is called an electrical synapse, and the other is by a much more complicated way called a chemical synapse. In the case of the chemical synapse, the two neurons are not in strict contact, but have a small gap between them called the synaptic cleft. The signal is transmitted when one neuron releases a chemical (called neurotransmitter) into the synaptic cleft which is detected by the second neuron thru activation of receptors placed exactly opposite to the release site. The binding of the neurotransmitter to the receptors causes a series of physiological changes in the second neuron which constitutes the signal. Usually the release from the first neuron (called presynaptic) is caused by a series of intracellular events evoked by a depolarization of its membrane, and almost invariably when an action potential takes place. The signal that is evoked in the second (postsynaptic) neuron is in the form of a depolarization of its membrane.

 

Although very subtile, this is an energy that you can unmistakably feel, even to the point of almost being overwhelmed if too large a dose is taken. Where most "energy drinks," or in industry trade language, "functional beverages," use sugar and caffeine and in some cases herbs and vitamins that boost energy at a metabolic level, the materials we're using cause energy at the cellular level that is far more akin to electrical output than it is to a temporary burst at the metabolic level or at the level of chemical conversion in the muscles. As you can see by our Kirlian photography, the "electrical" output tells an astonishing story. This electrical output also increases the electrical, or electromagnetic, field of the user.

 

Reports have indicated huge boosts in mental and physical energy, aches and pains vanishing, increased mental clarity and focus, increased strength, stamina and sex drive, and looking and feeling younger, and huge boosts in strengthening the immune system.

 

Superhealth begins at the level of our cells. The reactions required to make these astonishing materials cause boosts in the presence of, and reaction with, hydrogen. When more hydrogen is present, the surface tension of water (or any other liquid) is reduced. When ingesting any liquid with a reduced surface tension of the water molecule itself, the result is a reduction in the surface tension of our cell walls. That allows a greater influx of oxygen which displaces carbon dioxide trapped in the cells, and also increases the uptake of any other nutrients present.

 

 

 

THE PHYSICS OF MONATOMIC ELEMENTS
Excerpted from an Article Originally Written by Everett Karels

 

Classical science teaches us that the three phases of matter are gasses, liquids, and solids (and the newer plasmas, Bose-Einstein condensates and liquid crystals). Some solids crystallize into a lattice structure called metals. What classical science does not teach us is that there is, in fact, another phase of matter called monatomic. These monatomic materials have ceramic-like properties.

 

Gold Crystal

 

Microclusters -

Nuclear physicists discovered in 1989 that the atoms of some elements exist in microclusters. These are tiny groups of between two and several hundred atoms. Most of the transition group precious metals in the center of the periodic chart exhibit a monoatomic state. If you have more than a specific number of these atoms in a microcluster, the atoms will aggregate into a lattice structure with metallic properties. If you have fewer than that critical number of atoms, that microcluster will disaggregate into monatomic atoms with ceramic properties. Monatomic atoms are not held in position by electron sharing with their neighboring atoms as are atoms in a classical lattice structure. The critical number of atoms for rhodium is 9 and the critical number of atoms for gold is 2.

 

The significance of this is that if you have two or more gold atoms in a microcluster, it will exhibit metallic characteristics. However, if you have 9 or fewer atoms in a microcluster of rhodium atoms, the microcluster will spontaneously disaggregate to become a group of monatomic rhodium atoms. You might wonder why there is one equilibrium state at a certain deformation level and a different equilibrium state at a different level of deformation. This is a question for nuclear scientists to ponder.

 

It has been observed that the valence electrons of monatomic elements are unavailable for chemical reactions. This means that monatomic atoms are chemically inert and have many of the physical properties of ceramic materials. Because the valence electrons are unavailable, it is impossible to use standard analytical chemistry techniques to identify a monatomic element.

 

After reading the above statement, one observer commented that the statement is not altogether true. He says: "There is a sort of shadow chemistry which still works on monoatomic elements. David Hudson speaks of the same color changes in monatomic chemistry as occur in metallic chemistry. From alchemical understanding, I suspect that similar chemical reactions still occur but at a much reduced rate. In other words, a chemical process which takes a few days with metallic chemistry may take months or years using this "shadow chemistry." For the sake of consistency, we might want to call this "shadow chemistry" "alchemy."

 

What the observer says may be true but he doesn't explain the physical mechanism at work here. Are the valence electrons unavailable for reactions in monatomic elements or not? Also, simply assigning a name to a phenomena doesn't explain the phenomena.

 

These are very recent discoveries and the full implications have yet to be evaluated by the scientific community. You won't find this in textbooks yet.

 

In general, a metallic element is physically stable and is a relatively good conductor of both heat and electricity and is usually chemically active. (Metals typically rust and/or corrode.) To the contrary, monatomic atoms of the same element behaves more like a ceramic in that they are generally poor conductors of both heat and electricity and are chemically inert. In addition, according to Hudson, monatomic elements exhibit the characteristics of superconductors at room temperature.

 

Russian scientists at the Institute of Mineralogy, Geochemistry, and Crystal Chemistry of Rare Earth's in Kiev explicitly state in their literature that atoms in lattice structures are metallic in nature and that these same atoms in the monatomic state are ceramic in nature. However, Dr. Kogan of the institute does not support all of Hudson's findings as being scientifically valid. It would be worthwhile if we could obtain a detailed critique of Hudson's work from that institute.

 

Monatomic atoms have been observed to exist in all the heavy elements in the center of the periodic table. These are the elements which have "half-filled" bands of valence electrons and include the following elements. Their atomic numbers are given in parenthesis (the atomic number represents the number of protons in the nucleus.) Ruthenium (44), Rhodium (45), Palladium (46), Silver (47), Osmium (76), Iridium (77), Platinum (78), and Gold (79). Other metallic elements in the same part of the periodic table have also been observed in microclusters. Because the atoms of monatomic elements are not held in a rigid lattice network, their physical characteristics are quite different from atoms which are locked in the lattice. Thus, it is the grouping of atoms which defines the physical characteristics of the element; not just the number of neutrons and protons in the nucleus as previously believed. If you don't have a lattice network, you don't have a metal even though the atoms of the two forms of matter are identical!

 

The implication here is that there is an entirely new phase of matter lurking about the universe. This form (phase) of matter is comprised of monatomic elements; a heretofore unknown form (phase) of matter. They have remained unknown for so long because they are inert and undetectable by normal analytical techniques.

 

This might be nothing but a scientific curiosity except for the fact that Hudson now claims that a relatively large amount of this previously undiscovered monatomic matter seems to exist in the earth's crust.

 

Limitations of Analytical Chemistry -

How could it be that a small percentage of the earth's matter could be comprised of material which heretofore has been completely undiscovered? It has to do with the theory of analytical chemistry. None of the detection techniques of analytical chemistry can detect monatomic elements. They can only detect elements by interacting with their valence electrons. Because the valence electrons of monatomic atoms are unavailable, the atoms are unidentifiable. To detect a monatomic element requires that you first convert it from its monatomic state to its normal state to allow the element to be detected with conventional instrumentation. As a result, this phase of matter has existed as a stealth material right under the noses of scientists without detection until very recently.

 

Some observers claim that there should be reliable detection techniques for monatomic matter but you have to know what you are looking for to make use of the techniques. If you do not suspect that monatomic matter exists, it is unlikely you will accidentally find it.

 

Peculiarities of Monatomic Elements -

The monatomic form of an element exhibits physical characteristics which are entirely different from its metallic form. These differences are currently being investigated by nuclear physicists so it isn't possible to make an exhaustive list of the differences. A few of the differences will be noted.

 

Classical literature states that the white powder has a fluorescent-like glow. Hudson says that this powder behaves as a superconductor at room temperature, giving it very interesting properties. Because it is a superconductor, it tends to "ride" on the magnetic field of the earth, giving it the powers of levitation. It has been found to be very difficult to determine the specific gravity of monatomic elements because the weight varies widely with temperature and the magnetic environment. Under some circumstances, monatomic elements weigh less than zero! That is, a container full of monatomic matter could be observed to weigh less than the empty container.

Noble metals produce an extreme concentration of 'superfood'. The conductivity which feeds the building blocks of life and higher consciousness. These are high quality monoatomic elements.

These are also known as ORMES (Orbitally Rearranged Monoatomic Elements) or ORMUS and m-state elements, and the newest theories in physics as they relate to this area of research assert that some elements on the periodic chart might be diatomic (two atoms) or small atomic cluster "condensates," which are known in the scientific community as "Bose-Einstein Condensates."

ZP.tech starts with natural monoatomic elements from Southern Utah. Mineral deposits found here are among the highest concentrations in the world. We collect and use these base materials in many of our formulas.